ASK THE BOARD: Are QR Codes Here to Stay?

0
What technology will replace Quick Response (QR) codes in the future?
This week’s question is answered by members of the DSE Advisory Board
END USER COUNCIL

Read the Answer by Doug Anderson

“If I had to choose a single technology, I would likely go with low-energy Bluetooth beacons. NFC is also a likely choice, but is limited to close-range activation, which is good for security …”
DOUG ANDERSON
Senior Director – Information Technology
LA Metro Transit
 

Read the Answer by Penny Carter

“QR codes have been around for quite some time, but require another application such as a QR code reader in order to scan.”
PENNY CARTER
Digital Signage Lead – Lockheed Martin
 

Read the Answer by Lawrence Chang

“From what I’ve seen and experienced locally, only quick-serve restaurants and movie theatres have been using QR codes around my area.”
LAWRENCE CHANG
Director, IT – Calgary TELUS Convention Centre
 

Read the Answer by Frank Coccaro

“QR codes have been around since 1994 and are probably going to be around for at least a little while longer.”
FRANK COCCARO
Executive Director of Multimedia
MGM Resorts International
 

Read the Answer by William Coffey

“There are several types of technology available, which could serve as suitable replacements for QR codes. QR codes do seem to be gaining in popularity thanks to recent IOS updates …”
WILLIAM “WILL” COFFEY
Department Systems Administrator, Information Systems
McCarran International Airport
 

Read the Answer by Angel Cordero

“Signage communication is often about getting clients to perform an action such as buying, registering, visiting, and learning more.”
ANGEL CORDERO
Signage & Kiosk Solutions – Walt Disney Parks & Resorts
 

Read the Answer by Dominic DeSieno

“QR codes are the Twinkies of the digital world. They seem to keep surviving no matter what. There has been talk of “QR Code Killers” since 2011, but here they are, still playing a part in the game.”
DOMINIC DeSIENO
Digital Signage Technology Lead, Corporate Video Services Team
Wells Fargo
 

Read the Answer by Len Dudis

“The biggest advantage of QR codes is that they are passive by nature, meaning that the intended recipient must actively do something with their device in order to activate the code.”
LEN DUDIS
CIO – Grupo Vidanta
 

Read the Answer by Joshua Eftekhari-Asl

“I can see Near Field Communication (NFC) ultimately beating out QR codes in the future.”
JOSHUA EFTEKHARI-ASL
Senior Manager, Kiosk – Taco Bell
 

Read the Answer by Paul Fleuranges

“Depending on what you read, 2019 was declared “The year of the QR Code.” Once thought to be sitting atop the heap of the ‘hot tech’ graveyard, QR codes have made a huge comeback …”
PAUL FLEURANGES
SVP, Marketing
Pearl Media
 

Read the Answer by Cheryl Flohr

“Today, a friendly URL is the simplest and clearest path to get to a site. We see a site – name of company.com – and easily remember it to key in later. We might take a photo of it or just take some guesses to get there.”
CHERYL FLOHR
Director of Communications – Parker Aerospace
 

Read the Answer by Mark Geiger

“One possible replacement for QR Codes in the future could be Image Recognition. I have used this technology with Google Lens, which allows the user to simply take a photo of anything and search results for like or identical images.”
MARK GEIGER, DSCE, DSDE, DCME
Advertising Manager
Georgia World Congress Center
 

Read the Answer by Joshua Goodwin

“As technology continues to progress at a faster rate than ever, certain technologies tend to be forgotten and left by the wayside. One of those is the QR code.”
JOSHUA GOODWIN
Digital Signage Administrator – Eileen Fisher, Inc.
 

Read the Answer by Gary Harris

“QR codes will be around for a while. But for digital signs to reach out to users passing by, something like beacons are likely the future.”
GARY HARRIS
Digital Video Engineer – Notre Dame
 

Read the Answer by Jerry Harris

“Given its mass acceptance and broad reach across all industries, QR code technology has become the de facto standard for quickly connecting the consumer to information.”
JERRY HARRIS
Senior Director, Creative Services – Georgia Aquarium
 

Read the Answer by Jonathan Jackson

“With the mainstream adoption of the QR code as a step forward from the barcode, many industries and social scenes have adopted it in their products and processes …”
JONATHAN JACKSON
Business Analyst, Digital Transformation & Technology
Chick-fil-A, Inc.
 

Read the Answer by Chris King

“For the foreseeable future, I don’t see QR codes being replaced. They are still versatile and serve their purpose.”
CHRIS KING
Kroger Television Operations Manager – The Kroger Co.
 

Read the Answer by Joseph McQueen

“There are a number of technologies I’ve seen that could replace QR codes in the future …”
JOSEPH McQUEEN
Senior Manager of Network Services
American Eagle Outfitters
 

Read the Answer by Nate Morris

“I think a close range Bluetooth or Wi-Fi personal area network beacon technology could replace QR codes.”
NATE MORRIS
Manager, Enterprise Desktop Services
University of Nebraska
 

Read the Answer by Daniel Orme-Doutre

“QR codes are still around and are probably going to be around for many more years. While new technologies like NFC, augmented reality, clickable “paper,” and even SnapTag …”
DANIEL ORME-DOUTRE
Media Solution Architect – Microsoft
 

Read the Answer by Ralph Schorbach

“QR (Quick Response) codes have been around for quite a while now and as a matter of fact, since 1994. It was really beneficial “back-in-the-day” when Bluetooth and similar wireless connectivity methods had not yet come to fruition.”
RALPH SCHORBACH
IT Manager – Fairplex
 

Read the Answer by Guy Silver

“I’ve consulted my crystal ball: The future is a combined RFID and GPS experience.”
GUY SILVER
Communications Director
Costco
 

Read the Answer by Klaus Smit

“QR codes will be replaced by an array of different solutions depending on the application … “
KLAUS SMIT
Associate Manager, Innovation Team
PepsiCo
 

Read the Answer by Eliot Smith

“QR codes have made a bit of a comeback in the last few years and can still be very useful in instances where a URL is not the easiest way to get information to an end user.”
ELIOT SMITH
Senior Technical Product Manager, Retail Technology
Starbucks
 

Read the Answer by Steve Chewie Stavar

“I think QR codes have not peaked. The adoption of QR codes was slow because phones did not have a native QR reader in them that was easily accessible.”
STEVE “CHEWIE” STAVAR
Digital Signage Specialist – West Virginia University
 

Read the Answer by Jessica Stevens

“I would have to say that I think NFC could potentially replace QSR codes in the future. It does not require a scan, so it saves space on a digital sign.”
JESSICA STEVENS
Senior IT Deployment Manager – Best Buy
 

Read the Answer by Jason Stuehmer

“When considering the use case for QR codes, the goal is to guide the individual to additional information; typically delivering this information on their mobile device.”
JASON STUEHMER
Digital Signage/Screens
Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority
 

Leave A Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.