Ask the Board – September 24, 2018 | PAUL FLEURANGES

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“In a busy setting, do animation and sound in particular distract viewers from absorbing your messages, or do they help to draw attention? How much is too much?”


In creating content for our On The Go Travel Station network of kiosks and other digital signage, we don’t us sound because of the environment. However, we do use motion sparingly but with a purpose. The use of motion is based on the principle that it’s not the motion itself but the illusion or feeling of motion that attracts the viewer.  Our use of motion began with our “Courtesy Counts” content featuring our Bubble People.  We wanted to ‘break the ice’ and separate our content from the ads running within the same loop. Typically, one of the Bubble figures illustrates the behavior we want to highlight, but that subtle animation lasts between three and five seconds at the most to draw the viewer to the text on the screen.  Similarly, we use motion in our Planned Work assets, which explain weekend service disruptions.  We animate a photo of construction work happening in the system, employing the “Ken Burns” effect with the photo transitioning to text that follows.  Again it’s a subtle, clean move – nothing that screams at the viewer.  I don’t think your use of motion has to ‘shout’ at the viewer, which is why we tend to stay away from 

TEXT 

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About Author

Director of Corporate Initiatives
Friends of the New York Transit Museum

MEMBER OF THE DSE ADVISORY BOARD
End User Council

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